Statistics

The Offshore Injury and Incident Statistics for ‘09/’10 provided by the HSE (UK) provide a valuable insight into the highest areas of concern to be addressed. In this report, the upper limb (including hands, fingers & wrists) remains the highest risk area claiming an incredible 48% of all injuries.

 

Pinched, caught and crushed, fingers and hands are in constant danger while everyday tasks require crew members to place their hands directly on loads or pipes.

 

+ Report Summary

This report contains details of offshore accidents, dangerous occurrences and ill health reported to HSE from 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010, with summarised data back to 1995/96 for comparison. The main points are:
  • No fatalities arising from offshore work activities regulated by HSE were reported in 2009/10 for a third successive year.
  • 50 major injuries were reported, compared to 30 in 2008/09 and 44 in 2007/8.
  • The major injury rate per 100,000 workers rose from last year’s figure of 106.3 to 188.0 and is the highest recorded since 2005/6. The combined fatal and major injury rate is the same as the major injury rate.
  • 110 ‘over-3-day’ injuries were reported, a decrease of 30 compared to the previous year. The over-3-day injury rate decreased from 496 per 100,000 workers to 413.6 – a decrease of 16.6% compared to 2008/09. This is 68% lower than the peak of 1293 in 1995/96.
  • 434 dangerous occurrences were reported, compared to 477 in 2008/09, a decrease of 43. This is 43.2% less than the peak of 764 in 2000/01.
  • The estimated offshore workforce was 26,598 compared to 28,224 in 2008/09 - a reduction of 5.76%.
  • The ‘maintenance/construction’ work process environment continued to produce the highest number of ‘all injuries’ and ‘major injuries’ this year, followed by ‘deck operations’.
  • ‘Struck by moving objects’ produced the most injuries in a single category followed by ‘slips, trips and falls’, ‘injuries from handling, lifting or carrying’ and ‘falls from height’. These four categories account for 85% of all injuries. Injuries from slips, trips and falls, including falls from heights, account for 52% of all major injuries. Two thirds of major injuries were to limbs.
  • The ratio of over-3-day to major injuries decreased by 53% in 2009/10 to 2.2. This reflects the increased proportion of major injuries among the total of all reportable injuries compared to the previous year, although overall there was a reduction in the total of reportable injuries in 2009/10.
  • This year the three-year rolling average of injury rate for combined fatal and major injuries rose compared to last year’s low value, though overall there remains a continuation of the overall downward trend over the past 10 years. The three-year rolling average rate for over-3-day injuries continued to decline.

+ Nature of injury

The most frequent types of all injuries were fractures (27.5% - 44 injuries), sprains and strains (25% - 40 injuries), lacerations (15% - 24 injuries) and contusions (13.1% - 21 injuries). For major injuries, fracture was the most commonly occurring type, with 27 incidents which represents 54% of all major injuries (50). For over-3-day injuries, ‘Sprains and strains’ were the most common type of injury, with 40 incidents (36.4% of over-3-day injuries). Other frequent types of over-3-day injuries included lacerations (22 incidents – 20%), contusions (18 incidents – 16.4%) and fractures (17 incidents – 15.5%).

 

+ Part of Body injured

The upper limb counted for 48.1% (77) of all injuries for 2009/10 and the lower limb accounted for 26.9% (43). The torso accounted for 13.8% (22) of all injuries. The number of head injuries (9) rose 50% accounting for 5.6% of the total. Injuries to the limbs accounted for 33 (66%) of all major injuries.

 

For over-3-day injuries, injuries to the limbs accounted for 87 injuries (79% of over-3-day injuries). There were 55 incidents (50% of all over-3-day injuries or 63.2% of over-3-day limb injuries) affecting the upper limbs and 32 (29.1% of all over-3-day injuries) to the lower limbs. Of all upper limb injuries, 49 (63.6%) were attributed to injury to one or more fingers or thumbs (of which 89.8% were over-3-day injuries). Injuries to the torso accounted for 14.5% of all over-3-day incidents, with 16 incidents reported.

 

SEVERITY OF INJURY AND PART OF BODY INJURED – 2009/10





SITE OF INJURY
SEVERITY OF IN JURY
ALL INJURIES
FATAL
MAJOR
OVER 3 DAY
EYE
1
2
3
OTHER PARTS OF FACE
0
2
2
SEVERAL LOCATINS OF HEAD
4
0
4
PRODUCTION
0
0
0
TOTAL: HEAD
0
5
4
9





NECK
0
1
1
BACK
3
12
15
TRUNK
2
3
5
SEVERAL LOCATIONS OF TORSO
1
0
1
TOTAL: TORSO
0
6
16
22





ONE OR MORE FINGERS OR THUMBS

5
44
49
HAND

4
5
9
WRIST

5
1
6
REST OF UPPER LIMB

8
4
12
SEVERAL LOCATIONS OF UPPER LIMB

0
1
1
TOTAL: UPPER LIMB
0
22
55
77





ONE OR MORE TOES

0
2
2
FOOT

6
4
10
ANKLE

3
15
18
REST OF LOWER LIMB

2
11
13
SEVERAL LOCATIONS OF LOWER LIMB

0
0
0
TOTAL: LOWER LIMB
0
11
32
43





SEVERAL LOCATIONS

2
3
5
GENERAL LOCATIONS

4
0
4
UNSPECIFIED LOCATIONS

0
0
0





GRAND TOTAL
0
50
3
160

 

+ Kind of Accident

32 (20%) of all injuries were associated with handling, lifting or carrying activities, 47 (29.4%) from being struck by moving, flying or falling objects, of which 11 resulted in major injury. 37 incidents (23.1% of all injuries) were as a result of slips, trips or falls at the same level and a further 20 (12.5%) involved a fall from height, resulting in a total 57 (35.6%) of all injuries being associated with slips, trips and falls of all types.

 

+ Other Trends

Age of injured person
The majority of injuries (68.1%) were spread between ages ranging from 25 to 49 years of age, with the 35-39 year band recording the highest number of injuries with 30 (18.8%) incidents. The 40-44 year age band recorded the highest number of major injuries (9 incidents, 18% major injuries) closely followed by 45-49 year band with 8 incidents (16%).

 

Work Process Environment
The type of activity being carried out when the incident occurred is described in the Table below.

 

SEVERITY OF INJURY AND WORK PROCESS ENVIRONMENT – 2009/10





WORK PROCESS ENVIRONMENT
SEVERITY OF IN JURY
ALL INJURIES
FATAL
MAJOR
OVER 3 DAY
DECK OPERATIONS

13
31
44
DRILLING

8
11
19
MANAGEMENT

6
15
21
PRODUCTION

7
13
20
MAINTENANCE / CONSTRUCTION

15
38
53
OFFSHORE DIVING*

1
2
3
TOTAL

50
110
160

 

Work Process Environment categories were introduced for offshore incidents from April 2001. Prior to that, categories under ‘operation’ were used. Any direct comparisons of these categories should therefore be used with care. Most injuries occurred in the ‘maintenance and construction’ environment (53 incidents, or 33.1% of all injuries). The ‘maintenance and construction’ environment also had the most major injuries (15 incidents, or 30% of all major injuries – the same proportion as last year), followed by ‘deck operations’ having 13 (26%) and ‘drill’ which produced 8 (16%) major injuries respectively.

 

Agent of Accident
38.1% of all injuries (61 incidents) involved ‘surfaces, structures and building access equipment’. 25 incidents (15.6% of the total) involved ‘conveying, lifting storage systems and hand-held pushed/pulled transport equipment’. These two categories also accounted for the majority of major injuries (28 – 56% of major injuries).

 

Reportable Diseases
There were 10 cases of disease or ill health reported in 2009/10, compared with 21 in 2008/09. There were 4 cases of chickenpox and 3 cases of hand-arm vibration related injury.

 

Dangerous Occurrences
The total of 434 reported dangerous occurrences (DO) for 2009/10 represents a 9% decrease compared to the figure for 2008/09 (477 incidents). DO type 73 (release of hydrocarbon) accounted for 43% of all incidents (including 3 releases resulting from failure of safety critical equipment associated with a well) and DO type 77 (station-keeping, dropped objects and weather) accounted for 23.5% of all incidents in 2009/10. Failure of lifting machinery, etc. events (DO type 01) accounted for 8.8% of incidents and well related activities (DO type 13) accounted for 5.5%. No well related incidents (Table 12(a)) involved well blowout but 17 incidents involved operation of blowout preventers to control an unplanned influx into the well. Figure 12(a) shows the number of well related incidents since 2003/04 Fire or explosion incidents (DO type 74) decreased to 28, representing 6.5% of the total.

 

Figures taken from OFFSHORE INJURY, ILL HEALTH AND INCIDENT STATISTICS 2009/2010 found here.